Leslie's historic UK Guide Badge Syllabuses

Subtitle

 

1921 POR - Ranger Tenderfoot test


Must know the Guide Law, Promise and Salute.

Must understand the composition of the Union Jack, and the right way to fly it.

Must be able to tie four of the following knots:- Reef, sheet-bend, clove-hitch, bowline, fisherman's and sheepshank.

Elementary Guide drill.

Must have one month's attendance.

1924 POR - Ranger Tenderfoot test


Must know the Guide Law, Promise, Signs and Salute.

Must understand the composition of the Union Jack, and the right way to fly it.

Must know the three slings (St John's, Large Arm, and Small Arm) with their uses.

Must have one month's attendance.

After passing the Tenderfoot test a Ranger may be enrolled as a member of the guide Sisterhood.

1930 POR - Ranger Tenderfoot Test


Must know the Guide Law, Promise, Signs and Salute.

Must understand the composition of the Union Jack and the right way to fly it.

Must know the three slings (St John's, Large Arm, and Small arm) with their uses.

Must have one month's attendance.

After passing the Tenderfoot test a Ranger may be enrolled.

1932 POR - Ranger Tenderfoot Test


Must know the Guide Law, Promise, Signs and Salute.

Must understand the composition of the Union Jack and the right way to fly it.

Must know the three slings (St John's, Large Arm, and Small Arm) with their uses.

Must have one month's attendance.

1935 POR Ranger Tenderfoot Test


Must know the Guide Law, Promise, Signs and Salute.

Must understand the composition of the Union Jack and the right way to fly it.

Must know the three slings (St John's, large arm, and small arm) with their uses.

Must have one month's attendance.

After passing the Tenderfoot test a Ranger may be enrolled.

1938 POR - Ranger Test


1) Must have passed the Guide Tenderfoot Test.  ( A recruit may then be enrolled as a Guide if she wishes).

2) Must know how Scouting and Guiding began and have read Scouting for Boys or Girl Guiding or The Story of the Girl Guides or three chapters from Story of a Million Girls (the chapter on her own country and two of her own choice).  Must now the World Flag and what it stands for.

3) Must prove her ability to deal with two unexpected occurences such as are suggested by certain clauses of the following badge tests:- Handywoman, Fire Brigade and Rescuer; and know how to arrest bleeding.

4) Must follow a map for three miles in unknown country or cook a two-course meal out-of-doors.  Must know the Highway Code and be able to use a public telephone call box.

5) Must understand the rules of health, and must have taken twenty minutes exercise in the open air for thirty days, if possible, consecutively.  (In exceptional cases, exercise near an open window may be substituted).

6) Must have studied and understood the Promise and Law from the Ranger point of view, and prove herself dependable and steadfast of purpose by carrying out some definite undertaking for others.

Sea Rangers will be required to take the Ranger Test as given above.  At the same time, and so as to maintain their enthusiasm for Sea Ranger subjects, they can start work for he Able Sea Ranger Test.


(Note: As the Cadet Tests are under discussion, Cadets may, if they wish, continue to take the old Ranger Tenderfoot Test, which is as follows:

Must know the Guide Law, Promise, Signs and Salute.

Must understand the composition of the Union Jack and the right way to fly it.

Must know the three slings (St John's, large arm, and small arm) with their uses.

Must have one month's attendance.)

1939 POR - Ranger Test


1) Have passed the Guide Tenderfoot Test.  (A recruit may then be enrolled as a Guide if she wishes.)

2) Know how Scouting and Guiding began and have read Scouting for Boys or Girl Guiding or The Story of the Girl Guides or three chapters from Story of a Million Girls (the chapter on her own country and two of her own choice.)  Know the World Flag and what it stands for.

3) Prove her ability to deal with two sudden, unexpected occurrences such as are suggested by certain clauses of the following badge tests: Handywoman, Fire Brigade, Rescuer and ability; and know how to arrest bleeding.

4) Follow a map for three miles in unknown country or cook a two-course meal out of doors.  Know the Highway Code and be able to use a public telephone call box.

5) Understand the rules of health, and have taken twenty minutes exercise in the open air for thirty days, fi possible, consecutively.  (In exception al cases, exercise near an open window may be substituted).

6) Have studied and understood the Promise and Law from the Ranger point of view, and prove herself dependable and steadfast of purpose by carrying out some definite undertaking for others.

Sea Rangers will be required to take the Ranger Test as given above and in addition must swim 50 yards.  At the same time, and so as to maintain their enthusiasm for Sea Ranger subjects, they can start work for the Able Sea Ranger Test.

1943 POR - Ranger Pre-Enrolment Test


1) Pass the Guide Tenderfoot Test (a recruit may then be enrolled as a Guide if she wishes).

2) Study the Law and Promise from a Ranger point of view.

3) Know the Guide World Flag and what is stands for.

4) Attend H.E.S. training regularly for three months.

Additional for Sea Rangers - Swim 50 yards.


HOME EMERGENCY SERVICE

The following basic training is taken in conjunction with the Pre-Enrolment Test, and for Sea Rangers the A.B. Test.

Discipline

A high standard is very important.  Quick response to orders and absolute reliability are essential in times of crisis.  Regular drill should be included.  Regular attendance will be expected.  Uniform must be worn correctly and all clothing kept mended and in good order, ready for any emergency.

Punctuality and general reliability will be tested over a period of at least six months, and each Ranger must keep a detailed daily record for two weeks or longer, until an unbroken record for a whole week can be produced.

Fitness

A Ranger cannot give her best service unless she is fit and well.  To keep herself so is her personal responsibility.  She should:

1) Take at least half-an-hour's outdoor exercise every day, unless ill.

2) Know the rules of health and undertake to apply them in everyday life, with the definite aim of raising her own standard of fitness.

Messenger Work

Communication must always be kept open, and a Ranger should be trained and ready to help in this service.  She should be able to:

1) Memorise a message of twenty words, including names, figures and addresses, and deliver it correctly after covering a mile at Scout's Pace - even if she has met with frequent interruptions on the way.

2) Give and receive messages accurately over the telephone.  (This may be omitted only if there are no telephones in the neighbourhood.)

3) Write down verbal instructions briefly, clearly and accurately.

4) Show thorough knowledge of the Highway Code

5) Send and read in Morse or Semaphore at a speed of fifteen letters a minute.

6) Find her way about by day or night, showing intimate knowledge of the neighbourhood, and understand practical use of map and compass.  (Thirty-two points of compass to be learnt.)

Emergency Training

When an accident happens it is important that a Ranger should keep her head, but it is equally important that she should know the right thing to do. 

She should know the right way of dealing with the following:

1) Outbreak of fire, including use of stirrup pump.

2) Severe bleeding.

3) Gas attack, including use and care of respirators.

4) Suffocation.

5) Shock, including ability to light a fire out-of-doors and produce a hot stimulant in not more than twenty minutes.

6) Electrical breakdown, requiring repair of fuse wire; and the assembling of an electric buzzer so that it can be used.

1943 POR - Extension Ranger Pre-Enrolment Test


1) Have passed the Guide Tenderfoot Test and have studied the Law and Promise from a Ranger point of view.

2) Know the World Guide Flag and what it stands for.

3) Attend H.E.S. or Ranger training regularly for three months.


Extension Rangers cannot qualify for the H.E.S. Armlet and should take the Extension Ranger Service Tests, which are parallel to the Home Emergency Service basic training.

1947 POR - Pre-Enrollment Test


1) Study the Promise and Law from a Ranger point of view.  Know the origin and development of the Movement.

2) Know the symbolism and significance of the Union Jack, the flag of her own country, and the Guide World Flag, and be able to hoist them.

3) Treat for shock and show simple methods of stopping bleeding.

4) Wear her uniform correctly and smartly.  Take her place in squad drill.

(Alternative for Lone Rangers - Wear her uniform correctly and smartly; be clean, tidy and particular in her ordinary clothes, and wear a well-polished badge.  Know the commands given in simple squad drill so that she can take part in it when the opportunity arises.  Plan a series of health exercises and submit them to her Captain for approval; carry out these out for three months, sending in a record at regular intervals.)

5) Plan and carry out a day's expedition with a definite objective, taking a friend with her, and keeping a brief log.

Additional for Sea Rangers: Swim 50 yards.

Before being enrolled as a Ranger a recruit must attend meetings regularly and punctually for three months.

A recruit may, if she wishes, take the Guide Tenderfoot Test and be enrolled as a Guide at the end of one month.

1950 POR - Pre-Enrolment Test


1) Study the Promise and Law from a Ranger point of view.  Know the origin and development of the Movement.

2) Know the symbolism and significance of the Union Jack, the flag of her own country, and the Guide World Flag, and be able to hoist them.

3) Treat for shock and show simple methods of stopping bleeding.

4) Wear her uniform correctly and smartly.  Take her place in squad drill.*

5) Plan and carry out a day's expedition with a definitive objective, taking a friend with her, and keeping a brief log.

Additional for Sea Rangers: Swim 50 yards.

Before being enrolled as a Ranger a recruit must attend meetings regularly and punctually for three months.

A recruit may wear uniform with the exception of the Ranger enrolment badge, beret badge, or cap ribbon.  If she has previously been enrolled as a Guide she may wear her Tenderfoot badge in Ranger uniform.


* For a Lone Ranger taking the Pre-Enrolment Test the following is the alternative to clause 4:

Wear her uniform correctly and smartly; be clean, tidy and particular in her ordinary clothes, and wear a well-polished badge.

Know the commands given in simple squad drill so that she can take part in it when opportunity arises.

Plan a series of health exercises and submit them to her Captain for approval; carry these out for three months, sending in a record at regular intervals.

1953 POR - Pre-Enrolment Test


1) Study the Promise and Law from a Ranger point of view.  Know the origin and development of the Movement.

2) Know the symbolism and significance of the Union Jack, the flag of her own country, and the Guide World Flag, and be able to hoist them.

3) Treat for shock and show simple methods of stopping bleeding.

4) Wear her uniform correctly and smartly.  Take her place in squad drill.*

5) Plan and carry out a day's expedition with a definitive objective, taking a friend with her, and keeping a brief log.

Additional for Sea Rangers: Swim 50 yards.

Additional for Air Rangers: Know the Air Safety Measures

Before being enrolled as a Ranger a recruit must attend meetings regularly and punctually for three months.

A recruit may wear uniform with the exception of the Ranger enrolment badge, beret badge, or cap ribbon.  If she has previously been enrolled as a Guide she may wear her Tenderfoot badge in Ranger uniform.


* For a Lone Ranger taking the Pre-Enrolment Test the following is the alternative to clause 4:

Wear her uniform correctly and smartly; be clean, tidy and particular in her ordinary clothes, and wear a well-polished badge.

Know the commands given in simple squad drill so that she can take part in it when opportunity arises.

Plan a series of health exercises and submit them to her Captain for approval; carry these out for three months, sending in a record at regular intervals.

1957 POR - Pre-Enrollment Test


1) Study the Promise and Law from the Ranger point of view.

2) Know the origin and development of the movement.

3) Know the symbolism and significance of the Union Jack, the flag of her own country, the Guide World Flag, and the flag of the United Nations; be able to hoist them.

4) Treat for shock and demonstrate simple methods of stopping bleeding.

5) Wear her uniform correctly and smartly.

6) TAke her place in squad drill.

7) Plan and carry out a day's expedition with a definite objective, taking a friend and keeping a brief log.


Alternative clauses for Lone Rangers

5) and 6) Wear her uniform correctly and smartly; be clean, tidy, and particular in her ordinary clothes, and wear a well-polished badge.  Know the commands given in simple squad drill so that she can take part in it when the opportunity arises.  Plan a series of health exercises and submit them to her Captain for approval; carry these out for three months, sending in a record at regular intervals.

1960 POR - Investiture Test


In order to appreciate the contribution which Guiding can make in the present-day world the Ranger needs to know something of the development of the Movement from the early stages and to have an understanding of its fundamental principles.

Before being invested a Ranger recruit must attend meetings regularly and punctually for three months and maintain a high standard of personal appearance.

She should satisfy the Guider:

That she has an understanding of the Promise and Law from a Ranger's point of view and accepts the guidance which they give.

That she is able to take a full part in unit ceremonial.

That she understands the symbolism of the following flags: the Union Jack, the flag of her own country, the Guide World flag, and the flag of the United Nations.

During this period the recruit should:

1) Prove herself dependable by carrying out some definite undertaking for others.

2) Plan and carry out an expedition covering a minimum of six hours, taking one or two friends, and keeping a brief record.  The expedition should have a definite object.  Places of interest to be visited may be in cities, towns, or the country, and any form of transport may be used.

3) Interest a group of people in her own hobby or pursuit or pass one clause of the Ranger Service Star or Section specialist test.

Note: i) Sea Rangers who are unable to swim are expected to learn as soon as they join the section.

ii) Air Rangers are expected to learn the Air Safety Measures as soon as they join the section.

iii) A recruit may wear Ranger uniform with the exception of the Ranger Investiture badge.  If she has previously been enrolled as a Guide she may wear her Guide Badge in Ranger uniform.

1961 (July) POR - Investiture Test


In order to appreciate the contribution which Guiding can make in the present-day world the Ranger needs to know something of the development of the Movement from the early stages and to have an understanding of its fundamental principles.

Before being invested a Ranger recruit must attend meetings regularly and punctually for three months and maintain a high standard of personal appearance.

She should satisfy the Guider:

That she has an understanding of the Promise and Law from a Ranger's point of view and accepts the guidance which they give.

That she is able to take a full part in unit ceremonial.

That she understands the symbolism of the following flags: the Union Jack, the flag of her own country, the Guide World flag, and the flag of the United Nations.

During this period the recruit should:

1) Prove herself dependable by carrying out some definite undertaking for others.

2) Plan and carry out an expedition covering a minimum of six hours, taking one or two friends, and keeping a brief record.  The expedition should have a definite object.  Places of interest to be visited may be in cities, towns, or the country, and any form of transport may be used.

3) Interest a group of people in her own hobby or pursuit or pass one clause of the Ranger Service Star or Section specialist test.

Note: i) Sea Rangers who are unable to swim are expected to learn as soon as they join the section.

ii) Air Rangers are expected to learn the Air Safety Measures as soon as they join the section.

iii) A recruit may wear Ranger uniform with the exception of the Ranger Investiture badge.  If she has previously been enrolled as a Guide she may wear her Guide Badge in Ranger uniform.

1964 (March) POR - Investiture Test


In order to appreciate the contribution which Guiding can make in the present-day world the Ranger needs to know something of the development of the Movement from the early stages and to have an understanding of its fundamental principles.

Before being invested a Ranger recruit must attend meetings regularly and punctually for three months and maintain a high standard of personal appearance and understand the health rules as related to herself.

She should satisfy the Guider:

That she has an understanding of the Promise and Law from a Ranger's point of view and accepts the guidance that they give.

That she is able to take a full part in unit ceremonial.

That she understands the symbolism of the following flags: the Union flag, the flag of her own country, the Guide World flag, and the flag of the United Nations.

During this period the recruit should:

1) Prove herself dependable by carrying out some definite undertaking for others.

2) Plan and carry out an expedition covering a minimum of six hours, taking one or two friends and keeping a brief record.  The expedition should have a definite object.  Places of interest to be visited may be in cities, towns, or the country, and any form of transport may be used.

3) Interest a group of people in her own hobby or pursuit or pass one clause of the Ranger Service Star or section specialist test.

Note: i) Sea Rangers who are unable to swim are expected to learn as soon as they join the section.

ii) Air Rangers are expected to learn the air safety measures as soon as they join the section.

iii) A recruit may wear Ranger uniform with the exception of the Ranger Investiture badge.  If she has previously been enrolled as a Guide she may wear her Guide badge in Ranger uniform.

1965 (July) POR - Investiture Test


In order to appreciate the contribution which Guiding can make in the present-day world the Ranger needs to know something of the development of the Movement from the early stages and to have an understanding of its fundamental principles.

Before being invested a Ranger recruit must attend meetings regularly and punctually for three months and maintain a high standard of personal appearance and understand the health rules as related to herself.

She should satisfy the Guider:

That she has an understanding of the Promise and Law from a Ranger's point of view and accepts the guidance that they give.

That she is able to take a full part in unit ceremonial.

That she understands the symbolism of the following flags: the Union flag, the flag of her own country, the Guide World flag, and the flag of the United Nations.

During this period the recruit should:

1) Prove herself dependable by carrying out some definite undertaking for others.

2) Plan and carry out an expedition covering a minimum of six hours, taking one or two friends and keeping a brief record.  The expedition should have a definite object.  Places of interest to be visited may be in cities, towns, or the country, and any form of transport may be used.

3) Interest a group of people in her own hobby or pursuit or pass one clause of the Ranger Service Star or section specialist test.

Note: i) Sea Rangers who are unable to swim are expected to learn as soon as they join the section.

ii) Air Rangers are expected to learn the air safety measures as soon as they join the section.

iii) A recruit may wear Ranger uniform with the exception of the Ranger Investiture badge.  If she has previously been enrolled as a Guide she may wear her Guide badge in Ranger uniform.

Alternative Tests for Extension Guides

Hospital, Physically Handicapped and Post Groups

2) Plan and carry out an expedition according to capacity. 

Mentally Handicapped Group

2) Cook, out of doors, a two-course meal for two people, accompanied by, but not assisted by, a Guider.

1978 Ranger Guide Handbook - Pre-Investiture Challenge


Carry out a challenge from each of the eight sections, either one of the suggestions or another challenge of your choice agreed with your Guider:

* Learn to be Fit

* Creative Ability

* Train Yourself to Think

* Relationships with People or Enjoying Life with Others

* Train to serve others

* Home Craft Skills

* Enjoy the Out-of-Doors

qEd8BCZTanFwCI9l4H5JcSbVznpxWJNhb01x7WyFIcU