Leslie's historic UK Guide Badge Syllabuses

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1989 Guide Badge Book - Science Investigator Badge


Keep a record of all your investigations and be prepared to tell the tester about them.  You may have to talk about different projects with different testers.  You should make sure that you carry out all your investigations with care to safety.

1) Cary out all the investigations in this clause:

a) Wire a plug and find out about the correct fuses required for different appliances.

b) Find out how the gears on a bicycle work and explain their action.

c) Tell the tester about five sources of energy used in this country.

d) Design and make a device to measure lung capacity.

2) Choose and carry out three projects from the following:

a) Write a report on the energy efficiency of the building where you meet for Guides and suggest any possible improvements.

b) Make a fire extinguisher from household items and use it outside.

c) Design and make an instrument for measuring distance.

d) Build a personal alarm that could easily be activated from your pocket.

e) Build a machine to transport a large object (e.g. an empty Patrol box or suitcase) over a distance of 10 metres without using human help.

f) Make a device to project a ping pong ball at least 2 metres into a bucket demonstrating its accuracy 4 out of 5 times, using a piece of A4 card, 2 rubber bands and sellotape.

3) Choose one technical advancement in your lifetime and tell the tester about it.

1991 Guide Badge Book - Science Investigator Badge


Keep a record of all your investigations and be prepared to tell the tester about them.  You may have to talk about different projects with different testers.  You should make sure that you carry out all your investigations with care to safety.

1) Cary out all the investigations in this clause:

a) Wire a plug and find out about the correct fuses required for different appliances.

b) Find out how the gears on a bicycle work and explain their action.

c) Tell the tester about five sources of energy used in this country.

d) Design and make a device to measure lung capacity.

2) Choose and carry out three projects from the following:

a) Write a report on the energy efficiency of the building where you meet for Guides and suggest any possible improvements.

b) Make a fire extinguisher from household items and use it outside.

c) Design and make an instrument for measuring distance.

d) Build a personal alarm that could easily be activated from your pocket.

e) Build a machine to transport a large object (e.g. an empty Patrol box or suitcase) over a distance of 10 metres without using human help.

f) Make a device to project a ping pong ball at least 2 metres into a bucket.  Demonstrate its accuracy 4 out of 5 times, using a piece of A4 card, 2 rubber bands and sellotape.

3) Choose one technical advancement which has been made in your lifetime and tell the tester about it.

1995 Guide Badge Book - Science Investigator Badge

You should make sure that you carry out all your investigations with care to safety.
Keep a record of all your investigations and be prepared to tell the tester about them.  You may have to talk about projects with difficult testers.
1) Carry out all the investigations in this clause:
a) Wire a plug and find out about the correct fuses required for different appliances.
b) Find out how the gears on a bicycle work and explain their action.
c) Tell the tester about five sources of energy used in this country.
d) Design and make a device to measure lung capacity.
2) Choose and carry out three projects from the following:
a) Write a report on the energy efficiency of the building where you meet for Guides and suggest any possible improvements.
b) Make a fire extinguisher from household items and use it outside.
c) Design and make an instrument for measuring distance.
d) Build a personal alarm that could be easily activated from your pocket.
e) Build a machine to transport a large object (e.g. an empty Patrol box or suitcase) over a distance of 10 metres.
f) Make a device to project a ping-pong ball at least 2 metres into a bucket.  Demonstrate the accuracy of your device four out of five times, using a piece of A4 card, two rubber bands and sticky tape.
3) Choose one technical advancement which has been made in your lifetime and tell the tester about it.
2005 Guide Badge File - Science Badge

Do four of these clauses.  If you complete a further four clauses, you may have another badge.
1) Find out where some of the ingredients used to make sweets come from.  Then find some pictures of the plants that ingredients such as rice, sugar or cocoa are made from, and pictures of the counties where these plants grow.  Design a game to test people's knowledge of sweets and try it out on your Patrol.
2) Make two types of sweet and explain some of the science involved in the cooking process.  For example, what temperature did you heat the sugar to, and why?  What happened when you dissolved ingredients?  Were there any acid and alkali reactions?  Put together a chart or book to record your findings and share this with your Patrol or Leader.
3) Make two different kinds of health sweet, using ingredients like carob ( a healthy alternative to cocoa powder) or fruit.  Do a taste test with our Patrol comparing these sweets to ones they might normally eat.  Explain why the sweets you made are healthier for you.  Don't forget to check for allergies before the testing!
4) Look at a few different articles of clothing and find out what they are made from.  Are they man-made or natural fibres?  Test their properties - for example, use a magnifying glass to look at the fibres and how they are woven together.  Find out how strong they are and what happens when you wash them.  Explain why these properties are important for different types of clothing.  Record our finding s and share them with an interested adult.
5) Make some felt or another type of mate3rial.  Explain what the material is made from and the science involved in the process.
6) Design and make a device that can be used to measure a distance of 500m.
7) Do a nature survey of the plants and creatures you find at home, around your meeting place, or in a local park or nature reserve.  Record your findings and tell our Patrol or an interested adult what you found.
8) Find out what foods different types of animals and birds eat, and then make a bird or animal feeder.  Test how successful the feeder is by keeping a record of the creatures that come to visit it and how often they come.
9) Find out about different habitats and the sorts of animals you might find living there.  Design and make a bird or animal box.  Explain where the best lace to put it would be, and why.  Did it work?
10) Design and make your own weather recording equipment.  Use this to record the weather over two weeks. Compare your findings to weather forecasts (from TV, radio, newspapers or the internet) that covered the same time period.  Present your own weather results to your Patrol.
11) Find out about any famous scientists from your area - past or present.  Are there any places or events close by that can be linked to science, like museums, industry, nature reserves, or science festivals?  Produce a 'science map' of the area and mark where these places or people can be found. 
12) Ask your Leaders, family or friends what jobs they do.  Choose three of these and explain what science is used in this work - forces, senses, movement, special materials or equipment and so on. Then discuss what science you use when doing one of your hobbies.
13) Follow the news over two weeks and record the number of articles and stories linked to science.  Write your own article (for a newspaper, magazine, radio or TV story or the internet) about something to do with science that you think would make interesting news.
14) Design and make a hot air balloon that will transport an egg up into the air and back down again without breaking it.  Work out the safest way to get the balloon to rise.  Show the rest of your Patrol how you made the balloon, and explain to them how it works.
15) Build a machine that can transport a small item such as a tennis ball over a distance of ten metres.
2014 (September) Guide Badges Download - Science Badge

Complete all of the clauses.
1) Plan and undertake experiments or research in two of the following areas.  Show you understand the science behind what you have done.
* Transport - how would transport on the moon be different from on earth?
* Weather - learn about predicting, measuring, and preparing for weather.
* Crime Scene Investigation - find out what happens when a crime is being investigated.
* It's all about me - how to keep your body healthy.
* Science of a night out - what part does science play in a night out?
* Home of the future - how do developments in science and engineering improve the way we live?
* Animals and nature - what impact do we, as humans, have on nature and what positive things can you do to tackle this?
* Flash, bang, goo - can mixing things change what they do?
2) Find a recent news story in which science has played a part and discuss it with your Leader.
3) Do one of the following:
* visit a museum, science centre, zoo, botanical garden, science festival, aquarium or nature reserve, or attend a university/school extra-curricular day.
* ask a scientist, engineer or medical professional to talk to you about their work.
* find out more about two famous scientists.

2019 (July) Badge Finder - Science


Complete all of the clauses

1. Plan and undertake experiments or research in two of the following areas. Show you understand the science behind what you have done.

  • Transport – how would transport on the moon be different from on earth?
  • Weather – learn about predicting, measuring and preparing for weather.
  • Crime Scene Investigation – find out what happens when a crime is being investigated.
  • It’s all about me – how to keep your body healthy.
  • Science of a night out – what part does science play in a night out?
  • Home of the future – how do developments in science and engineering improve the way we live? 
  • Animals and nature – what impact do we, as humans, have on nature and what positive things can you do to tackle this?
  • Flash, bang, goo – can mixing things change what they do?

2. Find a recent news story in which science has played a part and discuss it with your Leader.

3. Do one of the following:

  • Visit a museum, science centre, zoo, botanical garden, science festival, aquarium or nature reserve, or attend a university/school extra-curricular day
  • Ask a scientist, engineer or medical professional to talk to you about their work
  • Find out more about two famous scientists

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