Leslie's historic UK Guide Badge Syllabuses

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1989 Guide Badge Book - Radio Communication Badge


1) Keep a log of at least 20 different amateur radio stations heard within a 2 month period.  If you have suitable equipment at least 5 stations should be outside the United Kingdom.  The log should include the date, time, call sign, frequency and, when known, the location of each station.

2) a) Know the internationally recommended phonetic alphabet.  Spell aloud phonetically simple words including your first name and home town.  Interpret words which the tester spells aloud phonetically.

b) Know the country prefixes for the call signs of 10 countries and the call sign prefixes for the different areas of the United Kingdom.

c) Know the meaning of 5 international Q-codes.  Explain the reason for their use.

3) a) Discuss with the tester the basic sections of a radio system.

b) Explain how radio waves are propagated over long and short distances.

c) Discuss with the tester safety at an amateur radio station.

4) Do two of the following:

a) Help with a Thinking Day on the Air or other special event station.

b) Prepare and read aloud a greeting message to last not more than 2 minutes.

c) Design a QSL (confirmation of contact) card for a Guide station.  Show how to fill in the details of a contact.

d) Construct a simple receiver for any radio frequency and tell the tester how it works.  Published circuits or kits may be used.

e) Show how to tune a radio receiver on more than one frequency band to give the best reception.

f) Arrange for your Patrol to visit an amateur radio station.  Be able to talk to your Patrol about the station.

A Guide who holds an Amateur Radio Licence or who holds an Amateur Radio Certificate qualifies for the badge.

1991 Guide Badge Book - Radio Communicator


1) Keep a log of at least 20 different amateur radio stations heard within a two-month period.  If you have suitable equipemtn at least five stations should be outside the United Kingdom.  The log should include the date, time, callsign, frequency and, when known, the location of each station.

2) Complee all the ollowing sections:

a) Know the internationally recommended phonetic alphabet.  Spell aloud phonetically simple words including your first name and home town.  Interpret words which the tester spells aloud phonetically.

b) Know the country prefixes for the callsigns of ten countries and the callsign prefixes for the different areas of the United Kingdom.

c) Know the meaning off five international Q-codes.  Explain the reason for their use.  

3) a) Discuss with the tester the basic sections of a radio system.

b) Explain how radio waves are propogated over long and short distances.

c) Discuss with the tester safety at an amateur radio station.

4) Do two of the following:

a) Help with a Thinking Day on the Air or other special event station.

b) Prepare and read aloud a greeting message to last not more than two minutes.

c) Design a CQL (confirmation of contact) card for a Guide station.  Show how to fill in the details of a contact.

d) Construct a simple received for any radio frequency and tell the tester how it works.  Published circuits or kits may be used.

e) Show how to tune a radio receiver on more than one frequency band to give the best reception.

f) Arrange for your Patrol to visit an amateur radio station.  Be able to talk to your Patrol about the station.

g) Be able to recognize by sound individual Morse code letters and numbers.

Note: A guide who holds an Amateur Radio Licence, an Amateur Radio Certificate or is a holder of the Amateur Novice Licence qualifies for this badge.

1995 Guide Badge Book - Radio Communication Badge

Note: A Guide who holds an Amateur Radio Licence, an Amateur Radio Certificate or is a holder of the Amateur Novice Licence may have this badge.
1) Keep a log of at least 20 different amateur radio stations heard within a two-month period.  If you have suitable equipment at least five stations should be outside the United Kingdom.  The log should include the date, time, callsign, frequency and, when known, the location of each station.
2) Complete all the following sections:
a) Know the internationally recommended phonetic alphabet.  Spell aloud phonetically simple words including your first name and home town.  Interpret words which the tester spells aloud phonetically.
b) Know the country prefixes for the callsigns of ten countries and the call sign prefixes for the different areas of the United Kingdom.
c) Know the meaning of five international Q-codes.  Explain the reasons for their use.
3) a) Discuss with the tester the basic sections of a radio system.
b) Explain how radio waves are propagated over long and short distances.
c) Discuss with the tester safety at an amateur radio station.
4) Do two of the following:
a) Help with a Thinking Day on the Air or other special event station.
b) Prepare and read aloud a greeting message to last not more than two minutes.
c) Design a QSL (confirmation of contact) card for a Guide station.  Show how to fill in the details of a contact.
d) Construct a simple receiver for any radio frequency and tell the tester how it works.  Published circuits or kits may be used.
e) Show how to tune a radio receiver on more than one frequency band to give the best reception.
f) Arrange for your Patrol to visit an amateur radio station.  Be able to talk to your Patrol about the station.
g) Be able to recognize by sound individual Morse code letters and numbers.
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