Leslie's historic UK Guide Badge Syllabuses

Subtitle

 

1947 POR - Queen's Guide Award


The candidate must still be a Guide when she gains the Award (being ready for the final test before her seventeenth birthday).

1) Be a First Class Guide and hold either the Little House or Woodcraft Emblem.

2) Be recommended by the Court of Honour and known personally to the District Commissioner, whose responsibility it is to endorse the recommendation.

3) Be capable of a sustained effort of service, to groups or individuals, to consist of:

a) Regular service over a period of twelve weeks in the home, school, church or local community.

b) At least twelve weeks' work for an Overseas community, which could take the form of regular letter writing, or the making and collection of equipment, toys or scrap books for the benefit of the community.

c) Three unexpected jobs given by the District Commissioner at different times in this period.

4) Finally, take a "Be Prepared" test, the arrangements for which shall be the responsibility of a Diploma'd Guider or her nominee.

Note: - It is the responsibility of the District Court of Honour to consider annually whether they standard maintained by holders of the Queen's Guide Award is such that the badge may continue to be worn.  The Green and Blue First Class Badges do not qualify for this Award.

1950 POR - Queen's Guide Award


The candidate must still be a Guide when she gains the Award, being ready for the final test before her sixteenth birthday.  The application form should be sent in not later than the sixteenth birthday, and the final test completed as soon after sending in the form as possible, taking into consideration the candidate's school commitments.

1) Be a First Class Guide and hold either the Little House or Woodcraft Emblem.  Candidates holding the Little House Emblem must also hold one badge from the Woodcraft Emblem.

2) Be recommended by the Court of Honour and known personally to the District Commissioner, whose responsibility it is to endorse the recommendation.

3) Be capable of a sustained effort of service, to groups or individuals, to consist of:

a) Regular service over a period of twelve weeks in the home, school, church or local community.

b) At least 12 weeks' work for an individual or community in the British Commonwealth or Empire overseas.

Where the candidate cannot find suitable service for herself (through her own church, school, or friends, etc.) she can apply to the Overseas Department, I.H.Q.  Such application must be forwarded through the District Commissioner.  Correspondence with a "pen" friend can only be accepted if it has been kept up for a much longer period than the three months, and has had some definite purpose in view.

c) Three unexpected jobs given by the District Commissioner at different times in this period.

4) Finally, take a "Be Prepared" test, the arrangements for which shall be the responsibility of a Diploma'd Guider or her nominee.

Note: It is the responsibility of the District Court of Honour to consider annually whether the standard maintained by the holders of the Queen's Guide Award is such that the badge may continue to be worn.  The Green and Blue First Class Badges do not qualify for this award.

1953 POR - Queen's Guide


The candidate must still be a Guide when she gains the badge, being ready for the final test before her sixteenth birthday.  The application form should be sent in not later than the sixteenth birthday, and the final test completed as soon after sending in the form as possible, taking into consideration the candidate's school commitments.  applications must be made on the special Queen's Guide form.  A leaflet, giving the full particulars of the test, is on sale at Guide Headquarters.

The candidate must:

1) Be a First Class Guide and hold either the Little House or Woodcraft Emblem.  Candidates holding the Little House Emblem must also hold either the Pioneer or Hiker badge.

2) The following reports are required:

From the Company Court of Honour

From the Guide Captain

From the Commandant of a week's (or two week-ends) camp, which the candidate has recently attended (recently, to be interpreted as being generally within the last eighteen months).

From the District Commissioner, based on her personal knowledge of the candidate.

3) a) Home Service: The candidate must prove herself capable of a sustained effort of service to a group or individual in home, school, church or local community.  Where she is not already doing some such form of service anything undertaken should be maintained for at least three moths before a report is given.

b) Overseas Service: The candidate must choose a country within the British Commonwealth and Empire overseas and prove in some practical way that she has increased her knowledge of, and interest in, it.  (This may be shown by making a scrap-book or collection , by correspondence with a pen-friend, by interesting her patrol, or in any way approved by the District Commissioner).  She must also make or collect something which she ahs found to be acceptable and send it to an individual or community in her chosen country.  It is the responsibility of the District Commissioner to see that effort has been put into this test, real interest aroused, and that any work sent abroad is of a high standard.

c) Commissioner's Test: The candidate shall prove her reliability, good manners and ability to work with or under other people by carrying out three jobs arranged by the District Commissioner.

It is the responsibility of the Division Commissioner to check that all these parts of the test have been carried out.

4) The candidate shall take a 'Be Prepared' test, arranged by an independent tester, appointed by the County.  This shall test whether the candidate can apply the knowledge fore which she wears badges, has courtesy and common sense, and can act promptly and intelligently in emergencies.  Re-tests will only be allowed in exceptional circumstances.

1957 POR - Queen's Guide


The candidate must still be a Guide when she gains the badge, being ready for the final test before her sixteenth birthday.

1) Be a First Class Guide.

2) a) Hold the Woodcraft Emblem; or

b) Hold the Little House Emblem and one of the following badges: Camper, Hiker, Pioneer.

3) The following are to submit reports:

a) The company Court of Honour.

b) Her Captain.

c) The Commandant of a camp (two week-ends or one week) attended within approximately eighteen months.

d) Her District Commissioner from personal knowledge.

4) a) Home Service: Prove capable of a sustained effort of service, of at least three months, to a group or individual attached to home, school, church, or local community.

A report of the service is required.

b) Overseas Service: Choose a country within the British Commonwealth overseas:

I) Prove in some practical way that she has increased her knowledge and interest in it, e.g. make a scrap book or collection, correspond with a pen friend, interest her patrol in the country.

ii) Having ascertained a particular need, send a gift or a collection to an individual or group in the chosen country .

Note: The District Commissioner is responsible for approving these projects and for satisfying herself that a real effort as been made and that any work sent overseas is of a high standard.

5) Commissioner's Test: Carry out three jobs arranged by the District Commissioner proving herself reliable, courteous, and co-operative in working with and under other people.

Note: The Division Commissioner is to satisfy herself that clauses 1-5 have been carried out.

6) The 'Be Prepared' Test: A test to ascertain whether the candidate can apply her knowledge and act promptly and intelligently in emergencies.  Courtesy and common sense are to be taken into consideration.

Note: I) The tester for Clause 6 is appointed by the County.  Re-tests are permitted only in exceptional circumstances.

ii) The Queen's Guide application form is to be completed and sent in before the candidate's sixteenth birthday, and clause 6 tested as soon afterwards as possible, consideration being given to school commitments.  Details of the test are contained in a leaflet on sale at C.H.Q.

1960 POR - Queen's Guide


Either of the following syllabuses may be used between 1st January and 30th September, 1960.  If the first syllabus is taken the whole test must be completed by 30th September, 1960.  After that date only the second syllabus may be taken.


First Syllabus

The candidate must still be a Guide when she gains the badge, being ready for the final test before her sixteenth birthday.

1) Be a First Class Guide.

2) a) Hold the Woodcraft Emblem; or

b) Hold the Little House Emblem and one of the following badges: Camper, Hiker, Pioneer.

3) The following are to submit reports:

a) The company Court of Honour.

b) Her Captain.

c) The Commandant of a camp (two week-ends or one week) attended within approximately eighteen months.

d) Her District Commissioner from personal knowledge.

4) a) Home Service: Prove capable of a sustained effort of service, of at least three months, to a group or individual attached to home, school, church, or local community.

A report of the service is required.

b) Overseas Service: Choose a country within the British Commonwealth overseas:

i) Prove in some practical way that she has increased her knowledge and interest in it, e.g. make a scrap book or collection, correspond with a pen friend, interest her patrol in the country.

ii) Having ascertained a particular need, send a gift or a collection to an individual or group in the chosen country.

Note: The District Commissioner is responsible for approving these projects and for satisfying herself that a real effort has been made and that any work sent overseas is of a high standard.

5) Commissioner's Test: Carry out three jobs arranged by the District Commissioner proving herself reliable, courteous, and co-operative in working with and under other people.

6) The 'Be Prepared' Test: A test to ascertain whether the candidate can apply her knowledge and act promptly and intelligently in emergencies. Courtesy and common sense are to be taken into consideration.

Note: i) The Division Commissioner is to satisfy herself that clauses 1-5 have been carried out and reports entered on the Queen's Guide application form.  This form is to be sent in before the candidate's sixteenth birthday.  Clause 6 is to be tested as soon as possible, consideration being given to school commitments.

ii) The tester for Clause 6 is appointed by the County.  Re-tests are permitted only in exceptional circumstances.

iii) Details of the final test (Clause 6) are supplied with the application form.


Second Syllabus

1) Be a First Class Guide ands show that she is trying to carry out the Guide ideals of service in the community, i.e. at home, at school or work, and at her place of worship.

2) a) Organise and take charge of a patrol camp, either as part of the Patrol Camp Permit test or after gaining the Permit; or hold the Woodcraft Emblem.

b) Hold the Little House Emblem.

c) Hold one of the following badges: Emergency Helper, First Aid, Lifesaver, Rescuer, Sick Nurse.

d) Hold the Commonwealth Knowledge badge.

e) Hold any two badges of her own choice.

3) For a period of at least three months undertake some form of sustained service to an individual or group connected with her home, school, work, or place of worship , or local community.

4) During the time that she is a Queen's Guide candidate use her badge skills and knowledge to give service in one of the following ways, to be selected by the District Commissioner:

a) Look after one or two children for a day to give the mother a rest.

b) Help to look after an elderly or sick person for a day.

c) Work for a day in a hospital or a home for old people or children.

d) Work for a day, for somebody who needs the help, at one of the following: spring-cleaning, interior decorating, cooking, gardening.

e) Help for a day in improving the County, Division, or District camp site, or with repairing, checking, packing, and otherwise maintaining the County, Division, or District camp equipment.

f) Make a useful woodcraft collection and take or send it to an Extension or town company or pack.

g) Spend a day, or two half-days, with one or two other Guides in collecting and stacking a supply of kindling and logs for an elderly or other person who needs the help.

h) Conduct a visitor from another country on a comprehensive sightseeing tour of her own neighbourhood or of a nearby town or city.

Note: i) The Application.  The Guide must have completed the First Class test before application is made for the Queen's Guide form.  Application is made by the Captain to the District Commissioner at least six months before the Guide's sixteenth birthday.  Before issuing the form the District Commissioner must consult the Guide's parents, Guiders, and Court of Honour to ascertain whether the Guide has time to complete the requirements before attaining her sixteenth birthday.  When the form is issued the Guide becomes a Queens Guide candidate.

ii) The Test.  At the time of the application the District Commissioner must consult the Division Commissioner to ensure that the service undertaken, or to be undertaken, under clause 3, is acceptable ant that there is a responsible person available to give a report on it.  it is the Division Commissioner's responsibility to decide whether the report is satisfactory.

When the candidate has competed the requirements in clauses 2, 3, and 4, the Captain and District Commissioner must decide together whether the candidate has done her best to continue to grow in understanding and practice of the Promise, since gaining her First Class badge, and has shown that she is trying to carry out the Guide ideals of service in the community.

The whole test must be completed before the candidate's sixteenth birthday, while she is still a Guide.

1961 (July) POR - Queen's Guide


1) Be a First Class Guide ands show that she is trying to carry out the Guide ideals of service in the community, i.e. at home, at school or work, and at her place of worship.

2) a) Organise and take charge of a patrol camp, either as part of the Patrol Camp Permit test or after gaining the Permit; or hold the Woodcraft Emblem.

b) Hold the Little House Emblem.

c) Hold one of the following badges: Emergency Helper, First Aid, Lifesaver, Rescuer, Sick Nurse.

d) Hold the Commonwealth Knowledge badge.

e) Hold any two badges of her own choice.

3) For a period of at least three months undertake some form of sustained service to an individual or group connected with her home, school, work, or place of worship , or local community.

4) During the time that she is a Queen's Guide candidate use her badge skills and knowledge to give service in one of the following ways, to be selected by the District Commissioner:

a) Look after one or two children for a day to give the mother a rest.

b) Help to look after an elderly or sick person for a day.

c) Work for a day in a hospital or a home for old people or children.

d) Work for a day, for somebody who needs the help, at one of the following: spring-cleaning, interior decorating, cooking, gardening.

e) Help for a day in improving the County, Division, or District camp site, or with repairing, checking, packing, and otherwise maintaining the County, Division, or District camp equipment.

f) Make a useful woodcraft collection and take or send it to an Extension or town company or pack.

g) Spend a day, or two half-days, with one or two other Guides in collecting and stacking a supply of kindling and logs for an elderly or other person who needs the help.

h) Conduct a visitor from another country on a comprehensive sightseeing tour of her own neighbourhood or of a nearby town or city.

Note: i) The Application.  The Guide must have completed the First Class test before application is made for the Queen's Guide form.  Application is made by the Captain to the District Commissioner at least six months before the Guide's sixteenth birthday.  Before issuing the form the District Commissioner must consult the Guide's parents, Guiders, and Court of Honour to ascertain whether the Guide has time to complete the requirements before attaining her sixteenth birthday.  When the form is issued the Guide becomes a Queens Guide candidate.

ii) The Test.  At the time of the application the District Commissioner must consult the Division Commissioner to ensure that the service undertaken, or to be undertaken, under clause 3, is acceptable ant that there is a responsible person available to give a report on it.  it is the Division Commissioner's responsibility to decide whether the report is satisfactory.

When the candidate has competed the requirements in clauses 2, 3, and 4, the Captain and District Commissioner must decide together whether the candidate has done her best to continue to grow in understanding and practice of the Promise, since gaining her First Class badge, and has shown that she is trying to carry out the Guide ideals of service in the community.

The whole test must be completed before the candidate's sixteenth birthday, while she is still a Guide.

1964 (March) POR - Queen's Guide


1) Be a First Class Guide and show that she is trying to carry out the Guide ideals of service in the community, i.e. at home, at school or work, and at her place of worship.  (See note regarding application.)

2) a) Hold the Patrol Camp Permit; or the Woodcraft emblem.

b) Hold the Little House emblem.

c) Hold one of the following badges: Emergency Helper, First Aid, Life Saver, Rescuer, Sick Nurse.

d) Hold the Commonwealth Knowledge badge.

e) Hold any two badges of her own choice.

3) For a period of at least three months undertake some form of sustained service to an individual or group connected with her home, school, work, place of worship, or local community.

4) During the time that she is a Queen's Guide candidate use her badge skills and knowledge to give service in one of the following ways, to be selected by the District Commissioner: (The District Commissioner may apply to the country's Guide Adviser for permission to substitute a piece of service similar to those already listed.  Such application is to be made before the service is undertaken.)

a) Look after one or two children for a day.

b) Help to look after an elderly or sick person for a day.

c) Work for a day in a hospital or a home for old people or children.

d) Work for a day, for somebody who needs the help, at one of the following: spring-cleaning, interior decorating, cooking, gardening, farm work.

e) Help for a day in improving the County, Division, or District camp site, or with repairing, checking, packing and otherwise maintaining the County, Division, or District camp equipment.

f) Make a useful woodcraft collection and take or send it to an Extension or town company or pack.

g) Spend a day with one or two other Guides in collecting and stacking a supply of kindling and logs for an elderly or other person who needs the help.

h) Conduct a visitor from another country on a comprehensive sightseeing tour of her own neighbourhood or of a nearby town or city.

Where relevant, if it is more beneficial to the person being helped, two half days maybe substituted for one whole day.

Note: I) The Application.  The Guide must have completed the First Class test by the time she is fifteen years and six months and before application is made for the Queen's Guide form unless special circumstances have made this impossible and permission ahs been obtained through the usual channels from the country's Guide Adviser for this requirement to be waived.  Application is made by the Captain to the District Commissioner at least six moths before the Guide's sixteenth birthday.  Before issuing the form the District Commissioner must consult the Guide's parents, Guiders, and Court of Honour to ascertain whether the Guide has time to complete the requirements before attaining her sixteenth birthday.  When the form is issued the Guide becomes a Queen's Guide candidate.

The current issue of the Queen's Guide leaflet must be used for fuller information.

ii) The Test.  At the time of the application the District Commissioner must consult the Division Commissioner to ensure that the service undertaken, or to be undertaken, under clause 3, is acceptable and that there is a responsible person available to give a report on it.  It is the Division Commissioner's responsibility to decide whether the report is satisfactory.

When the candidate has completed the requirements in clauses 2, 3, and 4, the Captain and District Commissioner must decide together whether the candidate has done her best to continue to grow in understanding and practice of the Promise, since gaining her First Class badge, and has shown that she is trying to carry out the Guide ideals of service in the community.

The whole test must be completed before the candidate's sixteenth birthday, while she is still a Guide.

1965 (July) POR - Queen's Guide


1) Be a First Class Guide and show that she is trying to carry out the Guide ideals of service in the community, i.e. at home, at school or work, and at her place of worship.  (See note regarding application.)

2) a) Hold the Patrol Camp Permit; or the Woodcraft emblem.

b) Hold the Little House emblem.

c) Hold one of the following badges: Emergency Helper, First Aid, Life Saver, Rescuer, Sick Nurse.

d) Hold the Commonwealth Knowledge badge.

e) Hold any two badges of her own choice.

3) For a period of at least three months undertake some form of sustained service to an individual or group connected with her home, school, work, place of worship, or local community.

4) During the time that she is a Queen's Guide candidate use her badge skills and knowledge to give service in one of the following ways, to be selected by the District Commissioner: (The District Commissioner may apply to the country's Guide Adviser for permission to substitute a piece of service similar to those already listed.  Such application is to be made before the service is undertaken.)

a) Look after one or two children for a day.

b) Help to look after an elderly or sick person for a day.

c) Work for a day in a hospital or a home for old people or children.

d) Work for a day, for somebody who needs the help, at one of the following: spring-cleaning, interior decorating, cooking, gardening, farm work.

e) Help for a day in improving the County, Division, or District camp site, or with repairing, checking, packing and otherwise maintaining the County, Division, or District camp equipment.

f) Make a useful woodcraft collection and take or send it to an Extension or town company or pack.

g) Spend a day with one or two other Guides in collecting and stacking a supply of kindling and logs for an elderly or other person who needs the help.

h) Conduct a visitor from another country on a comprehensive sightseeing tour of her own neighbourhood or of a nearby town or city.

Where relevant, if it is more beneficial to the person being helped, two half days maybe substituted for one whole day.

Note: i) The Application.  The Guide must have completed the First Class test by the time she is fifteen years and six months and before application is made for the Queen's Guide form unless special circumstances have made this impossible and permission ahs been obtained through the usual channels from the country's Guide Adviser for this requirement to be waived.  Application is made by the Captain to the District Commissioner at least six moths before the Guide's sixteenth birthday.  Before issuing the form the District Commissioner must consult the Guide's parents, Guiders, and Court of Honour to ascertain whether the Guide has time to complete the requirements before attaining her sixteenth birthday.  When the form is issued the Guide becomes a Queen's Guide candidate.

The current issue of the Queen's Guide leaflet must be used for fuller information.

ii) The Test.  At the time of the application the District Commissioner must consult the Division Commissioner to ensure that the service undertaken, or to be undertaken, under clause 3, is acceptable and that there is a responsible person available to give a report on it.  It is the Division Commissioner's responsibility to decide whether the report is satisfactory.

When the candidate has completed the requirements in clauses 2, 3, and 4, the Captain and District Commissioner must decide together whether the candidate has done her best to continue to grow in understanding and practice of the Promise, since gaining her First Class badge, and has shown that she is trying to carry out the Guide ideals of service in the community.

The whole test must be completed before the candidate's sixteenth birthday, while she is still a Guide.

1968 Guide Handbook - Queen's Guide


You may become a Queen's Guide and have the honour of wearing the Queen's Guide badge on your uniform if you hold the following:

1) An Eight Point Badge awarded within the last twelve months.

2) The Service Emblem and the Service Flash.

3) The Commonwealth Knowledge Badge.

4) The Little House Emblem and Camper Badge and one other badge from the Woodcraft Emblem

or

The Woodcraft Emblem or Patrol Camp Permit, and two badges from the Little House Emblem.

5) Two badges of your own choice, one taken from the Fitness Emblem and one from the Arts and Crafts Emblem.

You may complete the requirements for Queen's Guide in the Ranger Guide Service Section provided you do so before your sixteenth birthday.

1974 Guide Handbook - Queen's Guide


You may become a Queen's Guide and have the honour of wearing the Queen's Guide Badge on your uniform if you hold the following:

1) Two Eight Point Badges, one of which has been awarded within the last twelve months.

2) The Service Emblem and Service Flash.

Note: In order to retain your Queen's Guide badge you must renew your Service Flash annually.

3) The Little House Emblem and Camper Badge and one other badge from the Woodcraft Emblem

or

The Woodcraft Emblem or Patrol Camp Permit, and two badges from the Little House Emblem.

4) The Commonwealth Badge and three badges of your own choice, one taken from the Fitness Emblem, one from the Arts and Crafts Emblem and one from World Friendship Emblem.

Note: I) You may not use a badge to fulfil the requirements of more than one clause.

ii) You may complete the requirements for the Queen's Guide badge in the Ranger Guide Section, provided that you do so before your sixteenth birthday and that you hold at least two Eight Point Badges from the Guide Company, one of which you gained during the last twelve months.

1981 Guide Handbook - Queen's Guide


You may wear the Queen's Guide Badge if you:

1) Take a full part in the Promise-centred Eight Point Programme of your Patrol and your Company for at least two years.  Make sufficient progress in each of the Eight Points and in your understanding and carrying out of the Promise to be awarded two Eight Point Badges by your Patrol Leader's Council.  (One of these must have been gained within the last twelve months.)

2) Acquire the skill and knowledge necessary to achieve your best in gaining the following Interest Badges:

I) The Little House Emblem and Camper Badge, and one other badge from the Woodcraft Emblem.

or 

The Woodcraft Emblem or Patrol Camp Permit, and two badges from the Little House Emblem.

ii) Three badges of your own choice, one taken from the Fitness Emblem, one from the Arts and Crafts Emblem, and one from the World Friendship Emblem.

3) Prepare yourself to give service in the community through gaining the Service Emblem.

Prove that you are carrying out your Promise to 'serve the Queen' by completing clause 4 and 5.

4) Give real service to some section of the community and, by doing so, gain the Service Flash.

5) Increase your knowledge of the Commonwealth (of which the Queen is Head) or the World (in which the Queen is seen as a Head of State) by gaining the Commonwealth Badge or the World Friendship Badge.

Note: 

i) You may not use a badge to fulfil the requirements of more than one clause.

ii) If you wish to go on wearing the Queen's Guide Badge, you must keep your knowledge up to date and continue to be of service by renewing your Service Flash annually.

iii) If you start Guides when you are ten years old, make your Promise a month or two after joining the Company, and receive an Eight Point Badge each year for four years at about the anniversary of your Promise Ceremony, you will have to complete the requirements for your Queen's Guide Badge no later than just after your fifteenth birthday.

iv) You may complete the requirements for the Queen's Guide Badge in the Ranger Guide Section, provided that you do so before your sixteenth birthday (see Note (iii)) and that you hold at least two Eight Point Badges from the Guide Company, one of which you gained during the last twelve months.

1983 - Queen's Guide becomes a Ranger Badge.  Baden-Powell Award is introduced to be the highest award in the Guide section instead.

2019 (July) Badge Finder - Queen's Guide Award


The award is based on the concepts of personal challenge and participation, so don’t rush it or take the easiest options. Your Mentor or Adviser will be able to help you decide if something is a challenge for you or not. The award is split into five sections. 


Service in guiding – Take an active role in guiding at a range of levels. 

Outdoor challenge – Build your teamwork and leadership skills in a glorious outdoor setting. Where you go and what you do is up to you! 

Personal skill development – Try a new skill and develop it, or take an existing skill to a new level for a minimum of 60 hours over 12 months. A personal skill could be anything from ballet to circus skills, or from performing magic tricks to becoming a technology whizz! 

Community action – Get more involved with the world around you and gain a greater understanding of it through practical and research projects of your choice. 

Residential – spend two nights and three days away from home with new people. 


Don’t forget If you haven’t made your Promise, you’ll need to before the end of your second year working for the award to show your commitment to guiding. 


Getting started 

Get started by talking to your local Commissioner or Unit Leader. They will put you in contact with your County Queen’s Guide Award Coordinator and arrange for your Go! record to be updated. 


Mentors and assessors 

You will need a Mentor to support you while working towards the award. Before you start, you should agree a plan of what you will be undertaking for the award with your Mentor. This is a good time to work out what you are doing that can count towards other awards and qualifications. Choose a Mentor who you know through guiding and who can offer you advice and guidance while you are working on the award. Any changes to your initial plan should be talked through with your Mentor. You should also keep your Queen’s Guide Award Coordinator informed. Before starting each clause or element, you will need to pick someone to be an assessor, who will confirm you have completed the challenge at the end. Agree your choice of assessor with both your Mentor and Coordinator. For each element, ask somebody involved in the activity to be your assessor. It could be a Leader in the unit you work with or it could also be someone outside guiding who is an expert on the topic your Queen’s Guide Award challenge relates to, for example a sports coach. If you are working with new people, it may be someone you do not know very well. Make sure you ask the person to be your assessor as early as possible so that they can review your progress with you throughout the activity. You should think about who you are going to ask when you are planning, so you have time to approach them and ensure they are happy to assess you. Make sure you show your assessors the ‘Message to assessors’ on page 1 of your Queen’s Guide Award Record Book. 


What counts? 

Projects that you are undertaking for other awards may be counted towards your Queen’s Guide Award as long as this is included in your initial plan. Activities should not be counted towards more than one challenge or element within the award, so take care when planning what you are going to do. Projects that you are doing at school, college or work may not be used, although if you wish to develop these projects further then they may count towards your award. Remember, each project or event can be used for only one clause or element. If you are unsure if something can be counted or not, discuss it with your Mentor. 


Planning 

You need to put together a plan of what you will do towards your Queen’s Guide Award and have activities agreed prior to starting them. On page 5 is an example of a completed plan. This planning template can be downloaded from www.girlguiding.org.uk/globalassets/docs-and-resources/ programme-and-activities/queens-guide-award-planning-template.pdf. You need to make sure you share your plans and any updates with your Mentor and Queen’s Guide Award Coordinator. 


Queen’s Guide Award Taking a break 

You can take up to 12 months out from the award. There are many different reasons you might want to take a break, for example to fit around starting a new job, exams, travelling or other personal circumstances. This can be in one go or split into smaller breaks. If possible, breaks should be planned in at the beginning of the award. However, it is possible to arrange time out during the award if the need arises by discussing it with your Mentor and Queen’s Guide Award Coordinator. 


Top tip 

Over the three years your plans may change. Remember to share your updated plan with your Mentor and Queen’s Guide Award Coordinator. Recording what you have done Keep track of what you have done using the Queen’s Guide Award Record Book. You might also like to put together a more detailed record of what you have done. This will allow you to include more information and evidence of what you have achieved. You can do it through video journals, blogs, scrapbooks, a display, a written journal, a calendar and so on. Keeping a record of your accomplishments will help you in the future. Your Queen’s Guide Award will open doors to you as it shows your commitment and perseverance – virtues many employers for one look for. It is up to you, in agreement with your Leader and Mentor, to decide how you are going to present what you have done for the award. Be creative and use your imagination. 


Finished? 

Once you have completed all the clauses, complete your record book and send it to your Queen’s Guide Award Coordinator. She will confirm that you have completed the award, send the book to Girlguiding Headquarters to be signed by the Chief Guide and inform your Country or Region office. It is a good idea to take a photocopy of your record book before you send it to anyone, and to always to send it by recorded or special delivery. After your award is confirmed, it’s time to party! It is a great chance for your family, friends and others who supported you to share in celebrating your fantastic achievement. Girlguiding will also invite you to a celebration of your award, where you can share your success with other Queen’s Guides. You will be invited to three events to choose from (which may be different times on the same day). If there are special circumstances, such as graduation, exams or working abroad that make it difficult for you to attend the dates offered, please let Girlguiding know and we will do our best to accommodate you. 


Support 

There are a number of Girlguiding resources and programmes which can help you further. } Going Away With Guiding , Activity suggestions in Look Wider and More, available to download  Don’t forget Check if what you are planning to do for your Queen’s Guide Award can be counted towards your other awards and qualifications, for example Look Wider or your Duke of Edinburgh’s Award. If using an activity for more than one award or qualification you will need to decide and plan this beforehand, as the requirements for the different awards could vary slightly and you need to make sure you fulfil the requirements for all. 

 

If you decide to stop working on the award, you can restart after at least a year’s gap. Bear in mind that you can restart only once. Any challenges that you completed during your first attempt cannot be counted towards a second attempt, but any that were planned and not started the first time round can still be used. 


Queen’s Guide Award Service in guiding 

Take an active part in guiding at a variety of levels. 

Complete all four elements. At least one element should involve working with a minimum of two guiding sections. 

This clause is your opportunity to make a personal contribution to guiding. It requires a significant commitment to the charity but is extremely rewarding when completed. You should plan all four elements carefully, as one activity cannot be counted twice. So, for example, you cannot use the same residential event for both element 1 (practical service) and element 2 (taking on a new responsibility). Also, don’t forget that at least one of the elements must include two different guiding sections (Rainbows/Brownies/Guides/The Senior Section). 


Element 1 Carry out practical guiding service for a period of 60 hours. At least 20 of these hours should be dedicated to one particular activity or project. 

This element is meant to demonstrate a sustained commitment to guiding, so you should try to make sure that the service is done over a period of a few months rather than during one residential event. You can use a variety of activities to count towards this element. A few examples are:  regular unit meetings as a Young Leader or Leader; volunteering as an Adviser, Trainer or Commissioner; working as a member of a service team at a camp; taking part in a GOLD project; volunteering at a Girlguiding shop; volunteering at a campsite or activity centre; running peer-education sessions for other girls through 4. There are many other forms of service. If you have any other ideas, talk them through with your Mentor. 


Element 2 Attend a residential guiding event and accept a responsibility that is new to you or that furthers your guiding experience. 

The responsibility should be appropriate to your capabilities and the event should last for at least two days and two nights. A large part of giving service in guiding is the ability to take on new challenges. This element will give you the opportunity to take part in a residential guiding event and to expand your skills. There are many activities you could take responsibility for, such as: take charge of games and activities at a camp or holiday; be leader-in-charge at a camp or holiday; be a nominated first aider at a camp or holiday; become a Trainer and run some sessions at an event; lead a group at an international event. Don’t forget that there are many Girlguiding training opportunities that may help you to complete this element. These includes 1st Response and the Going Away With Scheme. Have a chat with your Mentor about the role you’d like to take on and how you will tackle the challenge. 


Element 3 Take an active part in the planning of an event that involves the participation of at least two units. 

This element will require you to work alongside others and develop teamwork skills. It will also require you to prepare well and communicate with other members of your working group. Some ideas could include: Rainbow Fun Day; Brownie Adventure Day; Guide Activity Day; Division campfire; World Thinking Day celebration. Contact your local Commissioner to see if she can help you with some ideas of what to do. Mentor help Your Mentor will help you decide what type of event to organise and will give you some tips on getting enough support for the event. Top tip Remember to make sure you have qualified instructors for any adventurous activities you might be running. 


Element 4 Actively participate in a working group or committee run by Girlguiding or your Country or Region, or get involved in a Girlguiding issue. Track progress and give feedback on your experiences to a local unit. 

This element is an opportunity to get involved in guiding projects outside your own County. It is also a chance to contribute to the development of Girlguiding. There are a number of ways to get involved, including: joining your Country or Region’s council or forum; joining the British Youth Council delegation; volunteering for a task and finish group; volunteering for a working group working on a UK-wide event; visiting and taking part in a WAGGGS seminar; joining the Scottish Youth Parliament delegation; joining the national SSAGO executive committee. Again, have a chat with your Mentor to decide on an appropriate project to become involved in. Track the progress of the project and then pass on your experiences to a local unit so that they know what’s going on. Top tip To find out about opportunities with Girlguiding, www.girlguiding.org.uk/what-we-do/events-andopportunities/event-and-opportunity-finder/. Keep an eye also on www.girlguiding.org.uk/ theseniorsection, YeSS e-newsletter and Country or Region communications for more opportunities. 


Queen’s Guide Award Outdoor challenge 

Develop leadership and teamwork skills in an outdoor environment. Participate in an outdoor challenge and demonstrate leadership skills as well as the ability to be part of a team by completing both elements. When taking part in a residential event and outdoor activities you must be able to lead your peers as well as work with them. The outdoor challenge is about developing your leadership and teamwork skills by preparing for and undertaking an exploration or expedition. To complete the clause, you must participate in two elements of an outdoor challenge and be able to demonstrate leadership skills and the ability to be part of a team while doing both. The County Outdoor Activity Adviser, or the person who has responsibility for outdoor activities in your County, has overall responsibility for this clause and will coordinate the assessment. You must discuss your detailed plans with her prior to making any bookings. She will enable you to have access to the training and support you need. If the challenge is to be carried out overseas, then the International Adviser must also be included in early planning discussions. 


Element 1 Before undertaking the challenge you must have undertaken and completed the following. 

The first six modules of either The Senior Section Permit or the Going Away with Scheme. 1. Plan a residential event. 2. Organise and administer a residential event. 3. Plan for safety and security of yourself and others (including risk assessments). 4. Make health and first aid arrangements. 5. Organise catering arrangements. 6. Organise and maintain equipment for activities. 

During your expedition or exploration for Element 2, you should have or be working towards other modules as appropriate to fulfil the requirements in The Guiding Manual (go to www.girlguiding.org. uk/making-guiding-happen/running-your-unit/events-and-going-away/girl-led-residentials/) regarding your group members – who they are, their ages and the venue for your event. If you already hold a qualification, is does not have to be redone. Further training as required to prepare you for the challenge. Speak to your Mentor and your Outdoor Activities Adviser to establish your training needs for your chosen event. You may be very experienced and so need little further training, or this could be your first real experience of leadership in the outdoors. Some types of exploration or expedition will require you to complete a Girlguiding or other qualification, such as: canoeing (with British Canoe Union); sailing (with Royal Yachting Association); rowing (Girlguiding’s Rowing Scheme); walking (Girlguiding’s Walking Scheme); power cruising (Girlguiding’s Power Cruising Permit); Ensure that your whole group has sufficient skills and experience to enable them to take part in the exploration or expedition as planned. Remember to discuss your detailed plans and purpose with the County Outdoor Activities Adviser (and the International Adviser, if appropriate) prior to making any bookings. Discuss your ideas with your Mentor and Queen’s Guide Award Coordinator too and keep them informed throughout. Element 2 Participate in an exploration or expedition to last four days (three nights) accompanied by your peers. 


Purpose and plan 

Your exploration or expedition should have a purpose (decided prior to the trip and approved by your Mentor and the County Outdoor Activities Adviser) and a clear plan as to how you are going to achieve it. You can choose anything that appeals to you, such as: } exploring historic buildings } examining town layouts or architecture } examining the flora and fauna of an area } looking at the development of the group dynamic in your team. These are sample ideas only so take time to think about what you would like your purpose to be and discuss it as a team. Every award expedition or exploration undertaken is different and therefore looked at individually to guarantee fair assessment. The group Members of the group can be anyone aged between 14 and 25 (inclusive) and need not be members of Girlguiding. At least one other member of the group must be female. The need for flexibility at the upper age range is recognised, however, and may be extended by the Outdoor Activity Adviser (or equivalent), on a case-by-case basis, by up to two years. The following conditions are very important. } You must have the written consent from an adult with parental responsibility for anyone under the age of 18 and these adults must be notified if the group is to include males. } Every person attending must complete a Health Information form. } There must be a minimum of four in the group and a maximum of seven. } You must complete the relevant Girlguiding forms and obtain the necessary permissions. } You must adhere to the requirements set out in The Guiding Manual (go to www.girlguiding.org. uk/making-guiding-happen/running-your-unit/events-and-going-away/girl-led-residentials/). } A maximum of four members of the group may be assessed for the award, and each candidate must take a leadership role during the challenge. } All members of the group being assessed must prepare a report of the challenge in a format of their choice for the assessor, showing where and how they actively took a leadership role (there may be a number of leader tasks or you could rotate), as well as playing their part in the team. Where? The area in which you carry out your exploration or expedition is your decision, but you must demonstrate an understanding of The Guiding Manual (go to www.girlguiding.org.uk/makingguiding-happen/running-your-unit/events-and-going-away/girl-led-residentials/). requirements to show you are going to be safe there. Where possible, ask that an adult is easily contactable and available within that area. This is done through the notification process and your Outdoor Activities Adviser will be able to help. You may stay in any type of accommodation, such as a youth hostel, camping barn or campsite. You will be responsible for having the correct equipment and for making sure that it is carried by you or available to you when and where needed. Arrangements for any members of your group with special needs can be discussed with your County Special Needs Adviser as well as the Outdoor Activities Adviser. Your report Keep a record or a log of events during the exploration or expedition, including how your leadership and teamwork skills have developed. The report can be in any format, as agreed with your Mentor and Outdoor Activities Adviser. You may wish to use: photographs; video/audio recording; drawing; poetry. . On your return, present your report (where possible to an interested group) and get your record book signed by your assessor. 


Explorations 

If you choose to do an exploration, it should be at least 30 miles from your home, preferably in a location (urban or rural) that is not known to either you or the other members of your group. If you have visited the area or place before, your exploration must challenge and extend your knowledge of it. Expeditions If you choose to do an expedition you may travel by various methods, the minimum distances are set out in the table below. 

Expedition type -Distance 

Foot 50 miles 

Bicycle 170 miles 

Horseback 75 miles, 6 hours per day 

Canoeing 6 hours per day 

Canoeing on rivers and canals with locks 40 miles 

Canoeing on the Norfolk Broads 50 miles 

Canoeing on rivers with white water (BCU 2) 40 miles 

Sailing offshore 100 miles 

Sailing inshore 80 miles 

Sailing on the Norfolk Broads or other inland waterways 60 miles 

Dinghy sailing 60 miles 

Rowing 6 hours per day 

Rowing on rivers 30 miles 

Power cruising including travel through locks 8 hours per day 


Overseas 

If the exploration or expedition is to be carried out overseas, you must fulfil the same requirements as for an exploration or expedition in the UK. From the beginning, talk with your County International Adviser as well as your County Outdoor Activities Adviser. The International Adviser can assist on the overseas aspect, and may be able to help in establishing useful contacts. 


Top tip 

If you intend to use your expedition for your Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Gold Expedition, you need to check with both your Queen’s Guide Award Coordinator and DofE Adviser that you are fulfilling the requirements of both awards. Make sure everyone who needs to know you are planning to do this does so when you start planning your Queen’s Guide Award. Don’t forget You need to have the correct licence for the expedition or exploration you are undertaking. This might mean doing additional modules to those completed in Element 1. These can worked towards during the expedition or exploration you are undertaking. 


Queen’s Guide Award Personal skill development 

Develop a personal interest or hobby. 

For a minimum of 60 hours over 12 months, take an existing skill to a new personal level or start a new skill and develop it. It will allow you to develop practical and social skills, meet new people, organise and manage your time, work with others and have fun! If you are stuck for ideas have a look at the activity suggestions in the Look Wider download from www.girlguiding.org.uk/globalassets/docs-and-resources/ programme-and-activities/look_wider.pdf. 

Twelve months is a fairly long time to develop a skill so you will need to set yourself targets along the way. You should discuss your proposed targets, dates for review and evaluation with your assessor and then inform your Mentor of your proposed plan. If during the progress of this challenge you feel that your targets should change because they were too easy or unrealistically high, then discuss the matter with your Mentor and assessor and adjust your targets if necessary. Your assessor for this challenge should be someone who is experienced and knowledgeable in your chosen activity or someone who holds an appropriate governing body or professional qualification, such as a coach or tutor. Discuss with them how you have developed your skill over the last 12 months: what you have enjoyed; what you have found most challenging; and how you could continue to develop your skill if you wished to. 


Queen’s Guide Award Community action 

Encourage active participation in the world in which we live. 

This clause will allow you to develop a greater understanding of the world around you and become more involved. Your topic does not have to be related to guiding and should include working in partnership with others in your community. Over a 12-month period, undertake two projects on a chosen topic. One should be of a practical nature and the other should be research oriented. You have 12 months in which to complete this clause, giving you enough time to finish the projects. Plan well to make use of the whole year. The evaluation should also be carried out within this time. 

Element 1 Your chosen topic must enable you to become involved practically at a local or UK-wide level, and allow you to undertake further research to deepen your understanding of the topic at a UK-wide and international level. Completing the practical and research projects It is up to you if you want to undertake the practical or research part of this challenge first or if you want do a combination of the two throughout the year. While undertaking both practical and research areas of this challenge make sure you think the following. 

a) Your chosen topic Make it as dynamic as possible. It could include gathering information from local people about the topic using survey methods, or more traditional sources of information such as books and TV. You could use information from Girlguiding’s Girls’ Attitude Surveys, available at www.girlguiding.org.uk/ social-action-advocacy-and-campaigns/research/girls-attitudes-survey/. Search the web as well for other useful sites. You could also collect case studies during your practical action. 

b) Your aim Think about what you want to achieve from your practical and research projects. It doesn’t matter if you are researching an issue to inform your practical project or vice versa, but deciding this in advance will help. 

c) Evaluating your role and the effectiveness of your projects Evaluate the projects with those you have worked with. Reviewing your projects is very important so it is essential to do it thoroughly. Think of the following: What did you learn from the projects?  Did you achieve your aims and objectives?  What difference did you make to others?  If you did it again, what would you do differently? 

Element 2 At the end of your 12 months, you should present the findings of your research project and an evaluation of the practical project to those who have been involved or to another group of people to be agreed with your Mentor. The assessor for this clause should be someone working on the projects with you. Discuss with the assessor your ideas from both the research and practical projects. Your evaluation and research should be presented with originality and at an appropriate time so those involved can attend. You may wish to invite a local Guide or Brownie unit, or a group from The Senior Section, to show them what you have done and how they can make a difference within their community.  

Queen’s Guide Award Topics Below is a list of topics that you may wish to consider. It is by no means exhaustive. The topic you choose will depend on your own situation and where you live. Discuss your chosen topic and how you propose to tackle the projects with your Mentor. 

Animal cruelty; Bullying; Crime and disorder; Democracy and citizen involvement; Discrimination (racial, disability, educational, financial, religious, sexual); Drugs (including smoking and alcohol); Environment (pollution, recycling, traffic, litter, energy, conservation); Food and diet (GM foods, fair trade, exploitation); Health; Homelessness; Information (access to information); Justice; Literacy; Parenting and childcare (play needs for children, needs of young parents); Personal safety; Politics; Poverty; Refugees and asylum seekers; Rights (women’s rights, human rights, children’s rights); Sexuality and relationships; Violence against women and girls 


The table below shows how sample issues could be explored across the different spheres. 

Local UK International 

Parenting and childcare 

Carry out research into local facilities for childcare. Are they adequate? How can they be improved? Contact some local agencies to organise a project in your area. Find out what children’s charity organisations are doing around parenting and childcare. What initiatives are they running? How effective are they? How do other countries’ childcare provisions compare with the UK’s? Do other governments have legislation in this area? Are there any organisations around the world working on such issues? 

Health 

Find out about local services for people with HIV/AIDS. Get involved with initiatives that are being run in your area. Which communities are at greatest risk from HIV? What organisations are working on preventing infection? What work is being done to find a cure? Which countries are most affected by HIV/ AIDS? What is or isn’t being done about it? 

Women’s rights 

Find out about provisions and organisations for women in your area. Start a women’s group and look into issues facing women in your area. Find out about any legislation that may be going through Parliament that could affect women’s rights. What effect would it have? How could you influence this process? Women’s rights vary around the world from culture to culture. Explore the differences and try to find out what different women think about their lives. 

Water pollution 

What are the waterways in your area like? How has this changed over the last few decades? Start a canal cleaning group and see what difference you can make. Are there similar problems elsewhere? Is anything being done about it? What state is the world’s freshwater supply in? Is water contamination a big issue elsewhere?  


Queen’s Guide Award Residential experience 

Develop interpersonal and communication skills in a residential setting. This is an opportunity for you to go away from home, to participate in a new experience, to make new friends and learn about each other and to work together as a team. The residential experience clause has no limits and provides unlimited opportunities. The basic requirements are that you take part in a residential event for a minimum of two nights and three days and attend an event where the majority of participants are unknown to you (this may sound daunting at first, however it is much easier than you think). There are many opportunities within guiding at Training and Activity Centres (TACs) or events such as 4 Basic Trainings and Innovate. To find out what residentials are coming up, look at www.girlguiding.org.uk/what-we-do/events-and-opportunities/ or guiding magazine. The event does not need to be organised by Girlguiding. This means that you could spend a weekend away with the National Trust or the Scout Association, or perhaps even go abroad with WAGGGS. It will be your responsibility to book the residential and raise funds to enable you to attend. Make sure you book in advance as some residentials are very popular and some may require you to take part in a selection process. You will need to find somebody who is willing to sign your record book and monitor your progress throughout the event. Once you have booked and confirmed your residential, speak to the organiser to explain that you are undertaking the challenge as part of your Queen’s Guide Award, and ask if they would be prepared to be your assessor. If they are not involved in guiding they may ask you to send a copy of the relevant part of the syllabus. The assessor will need to see you play an active role throughout the event, and sign your record book at the end of the event. 

Top tips

If you are working towards your gold DofE you could do one residential to count towards both awards – you just need to make sure it is long enough!  Speak to your County Queen’s Guide Award Coordinator and look at websites belonging to other organisations you would like to go away with for more ideas. 

qEd8BCZTanFwCI9l4H5JcSbVznpxWJNhb01x7WyFIcU