Leslie's historic UK Guide Badge Syllabuses

Subtitle

 

1921 POR - Embroideress Badge


Must embroider one of the following:

A Military or Naval Badge

A crest or coat-of-arms; or

Some heraldic design.

She should work a good specimen of white embroidery, for underlinen, baby linen, etc., either in broderie anglaise or solid white embroidery;

And embroider in silks or mercerized cottons a spray of flowers, shaded in their natural colours; 

And invent and work in colours a good conventional design, in which various stitches could be used, for a cushion cover, tablecloth, or some other useful article.

1924 POR - Embroideress


Must embroider one of the following:

A Military or Naval Badge

A crest or coat-of-arms; or

Some heraldic design.

She should work a good specimen of white embroidery, for underlinen, baby linen, etc., either in broderie anglaise or solid white embroidery;

And embroider in silks or mercerized cottons a spray of flowers, shaded in their natural colours; 

And invent and work in colours a good conventional design, in which various stitches could be used, for a cushion cover, tablecloth, or some other useful article.

1930 POR - Embroideress


A Ranger must be able to embroider an emblem or an equivalent design, and do two of the following: 

1) Work a decorative border to a towel or tablecloth in cross-stitch in one or two colours, or a gros or petit point panel.

2) Do a piece of quilting work showing all-over stitchery and sprig designs.  This may be done in white or colours.

3) Make and embroider a piece of bed or table linen with drawn-thread work or cut work or woven borders.

4) Make a piece of lingerie or a blouse, and ornament it with scalloping and English embroidery, ironing-off the design.

5) Make a sampler with name and date, showing not less than twelve different varieties of stitches or groups of stitches.

6) Do a decorative panel or cushion cover in applique work and be able to couch cord and use a variety of outline stitches. Or

apply a motif on a standard and understand the mounting of the work on a frame.

7) Do a piece of wool embroidery shoring foliage, flowers or birds in crewel, satin or other suitable stitches or fillings.

8) Do a piece of silk embroidery showing Sating stitch and shading, or Darning and shading, or Couched or laid silk embroidery.

9) Do a piece of work showing metal couched and raised, and understand the various methods of using felt or cord or parchment in padding.  Also how to use bullion.

A Ranger must also understand the joining of materials by one of the following methods: faggoting, Oriental stitch, lace stitch, coral stitch, surface darned herringbone.

1931 POR - Embroideress Badge


A Ranger must: 

1) Show, embroidered on a sampler or on other pieces of work, twelve of the following stitches: Any of those given in paragraph I of the Guide Embroideress test, or brickstitch, cable, couching or Oriental, Mediaeval or "Roumanian", whipped or interlacing stitches, flat (satin, long and short), pulled openwork, etc.

2) Be able to finish work by suitable hems, joins, cords, tassels, or show ability to adapt, build up, or prepare the design.

3) Must show a representative piece of work chosen from one of the following seven groups, and understand the kind of material best suited for it.  Also add to the stitch sampler at least two small specimens, sprigs, or motifs, each in a definite style.

a) Stitchery done with counted threads.

On linen, canvas, etc.

1) Cross-stitch, or 2) tent-stitch, or 3) "Assisi" work, or 4) Double running (stroke, line), or 5) "Petit Point," or 6) Norwegian ("Hardanger"), or 7) "Hungarian" (Zig-zag Florentine, flame stitch), etc.

b) Openwork and white work.

May be done in colours.

1) Needleweaving, or 2) "Broderie Anglais," or 3) cut work ("Punto Tagliato"), or 4) "Hedebo" (Danish), or 5) Counted thread work with square or open stitch, or satin stitch patterns, etc., or 6) drawn thread, or 7) Italian pulled work ("Ukranian"), or 8) "Shadow work" (crossed back stitch), or 9) Richelieu, etc. . . . Must prepare the work, and if 2, 8 or 9, must trace or iron off design.

c) Applique, couching and metal work.

Comprises all applying and couching stuffs, cords, threads, spangles, metal threads, purl, etc.  The sampler specimens should include either padding over thread and cord, single and double thread couching, or letters in "Soutache."  Understand what counterchange is, and how it is done.

d) Smocking.

Prepare the material and do traditional designs on a garment.

e) Embroidery.

A. Showing close stitches such as 1) "Flat Hungarian" (Russian), or 2) chain, or 3) darning, or 4) satin stitch (long and short, etc.) or 5) Knotted stitchery, or 6) laid Florentine (Oriental couching), or 7) "Figure" (Mediaeval, "Roumanian"), etc. . . . (Styles 1, 3 and 7 are not usually shaded.)

B. With open and varied stitches, show ten different fillings and ability to vary them, for instance 1) "Black Aragonese," or 2) "Jacobean" woolwork, etc.

f) Embroidery on net.

Can be worked in colours, with thread or silk.  Show at least ten different fillings and understand how to prepare work.

g) Quilting

Know how to prepare work.  Adapt traditional design.  Include varieties of pattern such as check, scales, interlacing lines, circles etc.


Note for Examiner: in all cases suitable equivalents may be accepted.  Owing to variety of names prevalent, alternatives in brackets have to be inserted.  As far as possible one name refers to D. M. C. Encyclopaedia of Needlework, by T. de Dillmont, from Girl Guide Headquarters.

1932 POR - Embroideress Badge


A Ranger must: 

1) Show, embroidered on a sampler or on other pieces of work, twelve of the following stitches: Any of those given in paragraph I of the Guide Embroideress test, or brickstitch, cable, couching or Oriental, Mediaeval or "Roumanian", whipped or interlacing stitches, flat (satin, long and short), pulled openwork, etc.

2) Be able to finish work by suitable hems, joins, cords, tassels, or show ability to adapt, build up, or prepare the design.

3) Show a representative piece of work chosen from one of the following seven groups, and understand the kind of material best suited for it.  Also add to the stitch sampler at least two small specimens, sprigs, or motifs, each in a definite style.

a) Stitchery done with counted threads.

On linen, canvas, etc.

1) Cross-stitch, or 2) tent-stitch, or 3) "Assisi" work, or 4) Double running (stroke, line), or 5) "Petit Point," or 6) Norwegian ("Hardanger"), or 7) "Hungarian" (Zig-zag Florentine, flame stitch), etc.

b) Openwork and white work.

May be done in colours.

1) Needleweaving, or 2) "Broderie Anglais," or 3) cut work ("Punto Tagliato"), or 4) "Hedebo" (Danish), or 5) Counted thread work with square or open stitch, or satin stitch patterns, etc., or 6) drawn thread, or 7) Italian pulled work ("Ukranian"), or 8) "Shadow work" (crossed back stitch), or 9) Richelieu, etc. . . . Must prepare the work, and if 2, 8 or 9, must trace or iron off design.

c) Applique, couching and metal work.

Comprises all applying and couching stuffs, cords, threads, spangles, metal threads, purl, etc.  The sampler specimens should include either padding over thread and cord, single and double thread couching, or letters in "Soutache."  Understand what counterchange is, and how it is done.

d) Smocking.

Prepare the material and do traditional designs on a garment.

e) Embroidery.

A. Showing close stitches such as 1) "Flat Hungarian" (Russian), or 2) chain, or 3) darning, or 4) satin stitch (long and short, etc.) or 5) Knotted stitchery, or 6) laid Florentine (Oriental couching), or 7) "Figure" (Mediaeval, "Roumanian"), etc. . . . (Styles 1, 3 and 7 are not usually shaded.)

B. With open and varied stitches, show ten different fillings and ability to vary them, for instance 1) "Black Aragonese," or 2) "Jacobean" woolwork, etc.

f) Embroidery on net.

Can be worked in colours, with thread or silk.  Show at least ten different fillings and understand how to prepare work.

g) Quilting

Know how to prepare work.  Adapt traditional design.  Include varieties of pattern such as check, scales, interlacing lines, circles etc.


Note for Examiner: in all cases suitable equivalents may be accepted.  Owing to variety of names prevalent, alternatives in brackets have to be inserted.  As far as possible one name refers to D. M. C. Encyclopaedia of Needlework, by T. de Dillmont, from Girl Guide Headquarters.

1935 POR - Embroideress Badge


A Ranger must: 

1) Show, embroidered on a sampler or on other pieces of work, twelve of the following stitches: Any of those given in paragraph I of the Guide Embroideress test, or brickstitch, cable, couching or Oriental, Mediaeval or "Roumanian", whipped or interlacing stitches, flat (satin, long and short), pulled openwork, etc.

2) Be able to finish work by suitable hems, joins, cords, tassels, or show ability to adapt, build up, or prepare the design.

3) Show a representative piece of work chosen from one of the following seven groups, and understand the kind of material best suited for it.  Also add to the stitch sampler at least two small specimens, sprigs, or motifs, each in a definite style.

a) Stitchery done with counted threads.

On linen, canvas, etc.

1) Cross-stitch, or 2) tent-stitch, or 3) "Assisi" work, or 4) Double running (stroke, line), or 5) "Petit Point," or 6) Norwegian ("Hardanger"), or 7) "Hungarian" (Zig-zag Florentine, flame stitch), etc.

b) Openwork and white work.

May be done in colours.

1) Needleweaving, or 2) "Broderie Anglais," or 3) cut work ("Punto Tagliato"), or 4) "Hedebo" (Danish), or 5) Counted thread work with square or open stitch, or satin stitch patterns, etc., or 6) drawn thread, or 7) Italian pulled work ("Ukranian"), or 8) "Shadow work" (crossed back stitch), or 9) Richelieu, etc. . . . Must prepare the work, and if 2, 8 or 9, must trace or iron off design.

c) Applique, couching and metal work.

Comprises all applying and couching stuffs, cords, threads, spangles, metal threads, purl, etc.  The sampler specimens should include either padding over thread and cord, single and double thread couching, or letters in "Soutache."  Understand what counterchange is, and how it is done.

d) Smocking.

Prepare the material and do traditional designs on a garment.

e) Embroidery.

A. Showing close stitches such as 1) "Flat Hungarian" (Russian), or 2) chain, or 3) darning, or 4) satin stitch (long and short, etc.) or 5) Knotted stitchery, or 6) laid Florentine (Oriental couching), or 7) "Figure" (Mediaeval, "Roumanian"), etc. . . . (Styles 1, 3 and 7 are not usually shaded.)

B. With open and varied stitches, show ten different fillings and ability to vary them, for instance 1) "Black Aragonese," or 2) "Jacobean" woolwork, etc.

f) Embroidery on net.

Can be worked in colours, with thread or silk.  Show at least ten different fillings and understand how to prepare work.

g) Quilting

Know how to prepare work.  Adapt traditional design.  Include varieties of pattern such as check, scales, interlacing lines, circles etc.


Note for Examiner: in all cases suitable equivalents may be accepted.  Owing to variety of names prevalent, alternatives in brackets have to be inserted.  As far as possible one name refers to D. M. C. Encyclopaedia of Needlework, by T. de Dillmont, from Girl Guide Headquarters.

1935 POR - Embroideress Badge


A Ranger must: 

1) Show, embroidered on a sampler or on other pieces of work, twelve of the following stitches: Any of those given in paragraph I of the Guide Embroideress test, or brickstitch, cable, couching or Oriental, Mediaeval or "Roumanian", whipped or interlacing stitches, flat (satin, long and short), pulled openwork, etc.

2) Be able to finish work by suitable hems, joins, cords, tassels, or show ability to adapt, build up, or prepare the design.

3) Show a representative piece of work chosen from one of the following seven groups, and understand the kind of material best suited for it.  Also add to the stitch sampler at least two small specimens, sprigs, or motifs, each in a definite style.

a) Stitchery done with counted threads.

On linen, canvas, etc.

1) Cross-stitch, or 2) tent-stitch, or 3) "Assisi" work, or 4) Double running (stroke, line), or 5) "Petit Point," or 6) Norwegian ("Hardanger"), or 7) "Hungarian" (Zig-zag Florentine, flame stitch), etc.

b) Openwork and white work.

May be done in colours.

1) Needleweaving, or 2) "Broderie Anglais," or 3) cut work ("Punto Tagliato"), or 4) "Hedebo" (Danish), or 5) Counted thread work with square or open stitch, or satin stitch patterns, etc., or 6) drawn thread, or 7) Italian pulled work ("Ukranian"), or 8) "Shadow work" (crossed back stitch), or 9) Richelieu, etc. . . . Must prepare the work, and if 2, 8 or 9, must trace or iron off design.

c) Applique, couching and metal work.

Comprises all applying and couching stuffs, cords, threads, spangles, metal threads, purl, etc.  The sampler specimens should include either padding over thread and cord, single and double thread couching, or letters in "Soutache."  Understand what counterchange is, and how it is done.

d) Smocking.

Prepare the material and do traditional designs on a garment.

e) Embroidery.

A. Showing close stitches such as 1) "Flat Hungarian" (Russian), or 2) chain, or 3) darning, or 4) satin stitch (long and short, etc.) or 5) Knotted stitchery, or 6) laid Florentine (Oriental couching), or 7) "Figure" (Mediaeval, "Roumanian"), etc. . . . (Styles 1, 3 and 7 are not usually shaded.)

B. With open and varied stitches, show ten different fillings and ability to vary them, for instance 1) "Black Aragonese," or 2) "Jacobean" woolwork, etc.

f) Embroidery on net.

Can be worked in colours, with thread or silk.  Show at least ten different fillings and understand how to prepare work.

g) Quilting

Know how to prepare work.  Adapt traditional design.  Include varieties of pattern such as check, scales, interlacing lines, circles etc.


Note for Examiner: in all cases suitable equivalents may be accepted.  Owing to variety of names prevalent, alternatives in brackets have to be inserted.  As far as possible one name refers to D. M. C. Encyclopaedia of Needlework, by T. de Dillmont, from Girl Guide Headquarters.

1938 POR - Embroideress Badge


A Ranger must: 

1) Show, embroidered on a sampler or on other pieces of work, twelve of the following stitches: Any of those given in paragraph I of the Guide Embroideress test, or brickstitch, cable, couching or Oriental, Mediaeval or "Roumanian", whipped or interlacing stitches, flat (satin, long and short), pulled openwork, etc.

2) Be able to finish work by suitable hems, joins, cords, tassels, or show ability to adapt, build up, or prepare the design.

3) Show a representative piece of work chosen from one of the following seven groups, and understand the kind of material best suited for it.  Also add to the stitch sampler at least two small specimens, sprigs, or motifs, each in a definite style.

a) Stitchery done with counted threads.

On linen, canvas, etc.

1) Cross-stitch, or 2) tent-stitch, or 3) "Assisi" work, or 4) Double running (stroke, line), or 5) "Petit Point," or 6) Norwegian ("Hardanger"), or 7) "Hungarian" (Zig-zag Florentine, flame stitch), etc.

b) Openwork and white work.

May be done in colours.

1) Needleweaving, or 2) "Broderie Anglais," or 3) cut work ("Punto Tagliato"), or 4) "Hedebo" (Danish), or 5) Counted thread work with square or open stitch, or satin stitch patterns, etc., or 6) drawn thread, or 7) Italian pulled work ("Ukranian"), or 8) "Shadow work" (crossed back stitch), or 9) Richelieu, etc. . . . Must prepare the work, and if 2, 8 or 9, must trace or iron off design.

c) Applique, couching and metal work.

Comprises all applying and couching stuffs, cords, threads, spangles, metal threads, purl, etc.  The sampler specimens should include either padding over thread and cord, single and double thread couching, or letters in "Soutache."  Understand what counterchange is, and how it is done.

d) Smocking.

Prepare the material and do traditional designs on a garment.

e) Embroidery.

A. Showing close stitches such as 1) "Flat Hungarian" (Russian), or 2) chain, or 3) darning, or 4) satin stitch (long and short, etc.) or 5) Knotted stitchery, or 6) laid Florentine (Oriental couching), or 7) "Figure" (Mediaeval, "Roumanian"), etc. . . . (Styles 1, 3 and 7 are not usually shaded.)

B. With open and varied stitches, show ten different fillings and ability to vary them, for instance 1) "Black Aragonese," or 2) "Jacobean" woolwork, etc.

f) Embroidery on net.

Can be worked in colours, with thread or silk.  Show at least ten different fillings and understand how to prepare work.

g) Quilting

Know how to prepare work.  Adapt traditional design.  Include varieties of pattern such as check, scales, interlacing lines, circles etc.


Note for Examiner: in all cases suitable equivalents may be accepted.  Owing to variety of names prevalent, alternatives in brackets have to be inserted.  As far as possible one name refers to D. M. C. Encyclopaedia of Needlework, by T. de Dillmont, from Girl Guide Headquarters.

1939 POR - Embroideress Badge


1) Show, embroidered on a sampler or on other pieces of work, twelve of the following stitches: Any of those given in paragraph I of the Guide Stitchery test, or brickstitch, cable, couching or Oriental, Mediaeval or "Roumanian", whipped or interlacing stitches, flat (satin, long and short), pulled openwork, etc.

2) Finish work by suitable hems, joins, cords, tassels, or show ability to adapt, build up, or prepare the design.

3) Show a representative piece of work chosen from one of the following seven groups, and understand the kind of material best suited for it.  Also add to the stitch sampler at least two small specimens, sprigs, or motifs, each in a definite style.

a) Stitchery done with counted threads.

On linen, canvas, etc.

1) Cross-stitch, or 2) tent-stitch, or 3) "Assisi" work, or 4) Double running (stroke, line), or 5) "Petit Point," or 6) Norwegian ("Hardanger"), or 7) "Hungarian" (Zig-zag Florentine, flame stitch), etc.

b) Openwork and white work.

May be done in colours.

1) Needleweaving, or 2) "Broderie Anglais," or 3) cut work ("Punto Tagliato"), or 4) "Hedebo" (Danish), or 5) Counted thread work with square or open stitch, or satin stitch patterns, etc., or 6) drawn thread, or 7) Italian pulled work ("Ukranian"), or 8) "Shadow work" 

(crossed back stitch), or 9) Richelieu, etc. . . . Must prepare the work, and if 2, 8 or 9, must trace or iron off design.

c) Applique, couching and metal work.

Comprises all applying and couching stuffs, cords, threads, spangles, metal threads, purl, etc.  The sampler specimens should include either padding over thread and cord, single and double thread couching, or letters in "Soutache."  Understand what counterchange is, and how it is done.

d) Smocking.

Prepare the material and do traditional designs on a garment.

e) Embroidery.

A. Showing close stitches such as 1) "Flat Hungarian" (Russian), or 2) chain, or 3) darning, or 4) satin stitch (long and short, etc.) or 5) Knotted stitchery, or 6) laid Florentine (Oriental couching), or 7) "Figure" (Mediaeval, "Roumanian"), etc. . . . (Styles 1, 3 and 7 are not usually shaded.)

B. With open and varied stitches, show ten different fillings and ability to vary them, for instance 1) "Black Aragonese," or 2) "Jacobean" woolwork, etc.

f) Embroidery on net.

Can be worked in colours, with thread or silk.  Show at least ten different fillings and understand how to prepare work.

g) Quilting

Know how to prepare work.  Adapt traditional design.  Include varieties of pattern such as check, scales, interlacing lines, circles etc.


Note for Examiner: in all cases suitable equivalents may be accepted.  Owing to variety of names prevalent, alternatives in brackets have to be inserted.  As far as possible one name refers to D. M. C. Encyclopaedia of Needlework, by T. de Dillmont.

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